Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Aubergine / Eggplant


We seem to be able to grow really good aubergines here without too much difficulty. This year we are growing two varieties. The flowers of the aubergine are lovely with a soft shade of lilac and undulating petals, they really do bring a touch of early summer colour to the vegetable plot.


We rarely get problems with aubergines apart from delays in germination with cooler weather in spring. We normally grow about 10 plants which is more than enough. What we cannot use we will distribute to friends and neighbours although many of our neighbours are unfamiliar with this plant and really do not know what to do with it.


We use aubergine in many different ways including:

Thinly sliced and roasted with some oil, spread with basil pesto and rolled up (you can add an anchovy if you eat fish).

or...

Aubergine paté with garlic and oregano - diced, sautéed with salt pepper, garlic, oregano and garlic. Add a few table spoons of water to reduce the amount of oil, add stock cube and let it cook until soft, mash with fork and cool. Delicious on fresh bread.


or...

Vegetarian Moussaka with layers of lentils, potato, tomato and cheese sauce.

How do you eat yours?


8 comments:

  1. I have aubergine envy - can only grow them in the greenhouse here and as I am the only member of the family that like (loves) them it doesn't seem worth the space

    I love baigan achari http://www.nibblous.com/recipe/183

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    1. That sounds good, I will certainly give that a try. Thanks.

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  2. I love to look at them and their flowers, they must be the most photogenic veg of the lot just a shame I don't like them.

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    1. I never used to like them but recently have grown to savour their delicate flavour.

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  3. Anonymous5:58 am

    Do try a (less sloppy) roasted version of ratatouille: chunks of aubergine/courgette/red and green peppers/onion/fresh tomato/garlic/thyme tossed with olive oil/S&P in a hot roasting pan and set in a fairly high oven, stirring occasionally until slightly caramellised, finished with fresh basil and perhaps some lemon juice, or balsamic, if preferred...

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    1. That sounds like a recipe I would enjoy - thanks

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  4. Mine were not as good as last year but I think they got hit by wind early in the year - will place them in a less windy location next year! That said I still have a good crop for Northern France. They either go into ratatouille - made as above in the oven or moussaka. Rosie

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    Replies
    1. Ours have done very well considering the dodgy start. I must look up a recipe for ratatouille - thanks for the reminder.

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